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How to Get More Leverage for your Company if your Customer Goes Delinquent

posted on 2014-08-05 by Dean Kaplan

All too often, commercial debt collection becomes a negotiation.  When negotiations begin, the stronger our client’s position is, the better these negotiations will go.  The ultimate deal struck could be a larger dollar amount collected, payments collected more quickly, avoiding going to court, or if necessary, the final outcome in court and the resultant judgment collection process. 

 

We are often amazed to find that our new clients often have boilerplate deficiencies which weaken their negotiation positions and cost them money in the long-run.  One boilerplate omission that we often see is no provision holding the customer liable for collection fees.  Below is an excerpt from our free ebook:  the Terms and Conditions Handbook which discusses over 70 items which should be considered for governing the vendor/customer relationship:

 

In the USA, typically, you will not have the legal right to recover collection costs or attorney fees unless there is a signed written agreement with this provision. Just having this provision on your invoices is not necessarily enough. You want to have a document signed by your customer indicating they agree to this provision and the Application is typically the best document to memorialize this term. You want to specifically include collection costs so that collection agencies can add this fee into the amount they are trying to recover on a pre-litigation basis, as they cannot add “potential” attorney fees at this stage. Whether or not you actually collect these costs, it gives you and your agents much more leverage during collection agency, litigation, and judgment collection activities.

 

In the event that Vendor commences any action to collect delinquent invoices, Applicant agrees to pay collection expenses and attorney fees, whether or not suit is filed.

 

We see the following version less frequently, but it has the advantage of spelling out the liquidated damages in the event of default. Some courts use a schedule to determine the fee to be awarded to attorneys for getting a judgment. This fee typically is substantially less than the contingency or hourly fee paid to the attorney. By having an agreed attorney cost in the executed Application, the Vendor has a much better chance of being awarded the full attorney cost, thereby offsetting the cost of having to litigate to get paid. It also helps at the collection agency stage, and gives in house collectors more leverage during the threat to send to collections:

 

We further agree to pay a 25% collection charge, in the event of default, if the account is placed with an attorney or bonded collection agency.”

 

When we are collecting on a $25,000 claim, adding our collection fee of 20% (i.e., $5,000) to the delinquent amount means that we can begin negotiating from a starting point of $30,000 (more if interest and/or late fees are also included in the provision).  By starting at a higher dollar amount due, this gives us a stronger negotiating position with the customer regardless of what the customer is negotiating for, for example a discount or more time to complete the payments.

 

When the customer realizes that the collection fees will be added to the amount due, this often encourages the customer to give the debt owed a higher place on the payment priority list.  In fact, this by itself can help us get a resolution while the debtor then pushes other debts back or ignores them entirely.

 

Any time we are able to collect collection fees our client is financially better off.  Our clients frequently choose to waive the collection fee as a way to motivate the customer to immediately pay what is due.  This is a far better option for many of our clients than going to court and often it incentivizes the debtor to pay off our client’s past due invoices instead of paying what is owed to other vendors.

 

This collection fee provision can also give in-house collectors better leverage with past due customers.  Phone calls and final demand letters sent to delinquent customers can remind them that if the claim is turned over to collections, they will be responsible for the significant collection costs.  This provision may motivate debtors to become current to avoid collections even when all previous collection attempts have failed.

 

Surprisingly, of the 22 terms and conditions examples included in our free ebook, only one included a provision for collection fees, and only six included a provision for attorney fees.  These omissions definitely represent missed opportunities for our clients.

 

For companies that use credit applications, the collection fee provision may be included in this document, as described in our free ebook:  the Credit Application Handbook.  For companies that do not use credit applications, this provision should be included in your terms and conditions which should also be referred to in the sales and insertion orders or other contract to be signed by the customer.




How Much Money is your Credit Application Costing You?

posted on 2014-07-25 by Dean Kaplan

Usually vendors use a credit application to collect information about a new customer and establish credit and contractual terms.  Unfortunately, often the credit applications we see are deficient in key items necessary to protect our clients in the event their customers become delinquent.  Below are some of the most painful situations we see at our commercial collection agency:

 

·         The contact information is not complete, allowing the customer to avoid you;

·         There is no acceleration clause included so that in the case of delinquency, all amounts owed are immediately due;

·         No clause is included making the customer liable for all collection costs in the event of default;

·         No clause is included making the customer responsible for attorney costs;

·         Provision for jurisdiction, litigation venue and law is incorrectly worded;

·         No clause allowing creditor to evaluate personal credit of business owner;

·         No personal guaranty language is included;

·         Signature block design is inadequate.

 

These items are not important if your customers all pay on time.  However, these credit application problems can cause lower recoveries if your customer becomes delinquent and you send the claim to our third party collection agency.  Yes, we have an 85% success rate on viable claims, but our clients are frequently forced to accept less than what is owed or longer payment plans because of the credit application problems listed above. 

 

A big reason for this is due to companies developing their credit applications without considering the debt collection process.  In addition, the attorney working on the credit application is probably not a specialist in contingency based debt collection litigation.  Nor do the credit professionals involved have direct work experience at a third party collection agency which would give them insight into what can make a big difference in the debt collection process.  Finally, often companies design their credit applications based upon other credit applications they have seen, keeping the same poor wording and omissions.

 

Unfortunately, until now there has been no single easy to find comprehensive credit application resource.  We know, because we have frequently tried to find one to give to our clients.

 

We did find an ebook by The Credit Research Foundation called “In Search of the Perfect Business Credit Application” which sells for $10.  Published in 2005, this 14 page ebook provides an excellent summary of a number of topics based on evaluation of nearly 100 credit applications.  For the price, this ebook provides a lot of value, but it does not address many of the issues we deal with frequently at our collection agency.  CreditToday subscribers have access to lots of articles relating to these issues (including several authored by me), but the information is presented piecemeal and is not comprehensive, and the same holds true for the other resources we came across.

 

This is the reason we have created the 77 page free ebook:  The Credit Application Handbook.  This ebook covers all the issues listed above and also provides sample language to solve each of these issues.  The ebook also includes:

 

·         A check list containing 40 items to help evaluate existing or proposed credit applications:

·         19 sample credit applications including our favorite two;

·         A list of information to collect to evaluate a potential customer’s creditworthiness;

·         A list of information to collect if a customer stops paying;

·         Terms of granting credit;

·         Terms to include to protect creditor if the customer goes delinquent;

·         Other terms to include which govern the commercial relationship;

·         Sample language for each term discussed;

·         Signature block design recommendations;

·         General advice on how best to utilize credit applications when making credit decisions.

 

The check list is designed to help you identify deficiencies in your current credit application.  The ebook navigation allows you to go directly to specific sections and the sample language options to cover each issue.  There is one sample provision that I can guaranty will save creditors thousands if not tens of thousands per year that has never been seen before because it is original based upon our years of commercial debt collection experience.

 

Please check out our ebook and share it using the social media icons listed below or any preferred means with other credit, accounting and business professionals.  We welcome your comments and suggestions – we will update the ebook with new commentary and information when appropriate.




Creative Ideas Solve Credit Risk Problems - How One Credit Manager’s Cre¬ativ¬ity Made the Big Sale Possible

posted on 2014-07-16 by Dean Kaplan

Most credit man­agers have been in this sit­u­a­tion: the com­pany wants to make the big sale, the buyer is ready, but their credit sit­u­a­tion doesn’t make a stan­dard trans­ac­tion pos­si­ble. Bud Rule, who has 40 years of credit expe­ri­ence, recently shared this story of a cre­ative solu­tion he used years ago.

Their com­pany was gear­ing up for the big annual trade show. A sales­man was work­ing with a dealer to place a large at the show. This was a long-term cus­tomer so every­one was happy. But, one prob­lem: the cus­tomer had shown slow­ness in repay­ment and the approved credit limit was not suf­fi­cient enough for the order.

Bud trav­eled to the trade show a cou­ple days in advance for a vari­ety of rea­sons, includ­ing to meet the cus­tomer face to face the day before the show started. The cus­tomer explained the unusual cir­cum­stances that resulted in their cur­rent predica­ment. Bud dis­cussed all the typ­i­cal meth­ods that the cus­tomer might use to gen­er­ate imme­di­ate cash or become more credit wor­thy, but noth­ing panned out.

Bud was under a lot of pres­sure to fig­ure some­thing out. Man­age­ment wanted the inven­tory sold. The sales­man wanted his com­mis­sion. And now a long-term cus­tomer was upset that he was being told “No” on a deal that would really help him.

Dur­ing the con­ver­sa­tion, he couldn’t help but notice the customer’s HUGE dia­mond ring. In a moment of inspi­ra­tion, he asked the cus­tomer if he was will­ing to put the ring up as col­lat­eral. They went out and got it appraised right then and Bud took it back and locked it in the com­pany safe. When the invoices were paid a few months down the road, Bud offered to fly back and deliver the ring. The cus­tomer was so happy with how things worked out that he flew to cor­po­rate to say thank you and put the ring back on his finger.

Bud told me “So many peo­ple look at the Credit Depart­ment as the ‘Sales Pre­ven­tion Depart­ment’. I’ve worked through­out my career to make it the “Assist Sales Depart­ment”. I’m sure many credit pro­fes­sion­als can relate to this.

Bud has had a long and quite pro­duc­tive career. At this stage, he is no longer look­ing for that high pro­file credit man­ager posi­tion and salary. He just wants to stay active (full or part-time) in the credit and col­lec­tion field. So any­one who could use a highly expe­ri­enced pro­fes­sional for daily rou­tine mat­ters or to help improve things, check out Bud’s pro­file on LinkedIn.

And a shout out to all AR pro­fes­sion­als: please con­tact me if you have a story where you have cre­atively solved a credit prob­lem. I want to share more exam­ples with our com­mu­nity so we can all learn from each other.




Using a Collection Agency to Preserve Customer Relationships

posted on 2014-06-05 by Dean Kaplan

A Credit Manager’s Cre­ative Way of Sav­ing Customers

This Article by Dean Kaplan was originally published on our Blog at The Kaplan Group.

Want to see a sales­per­son squirm with dis­plea­sure: just tell them the account for a long-term cus­tomer is being sent to a col­lec­tion agency.  The sales­per­son has visions of rogue debt col­lec­tors bad­ger­ing their cus­tomer with threats of bad credit ref­er­ences, legal suits, judg­ments and gar­nish­ments, car­ing only about col­lect­ing a few dol­lars and no con­cern about pre­serv­ing rela­tion­ships.  They assume that once the cus­tomer has been through this ringer, he’ll never talk to the sales­per­son again.

Of course, this cus­tomer hasn’t been talk­ing to the sales­man since his account went past due and his credit avail­abil­ity was sus­pended.  At the last indus­try trade-show, the sales­man saw his cus­tomer com­ing down the aisle, but then abruptly turn away when brief eye-contact was made.  Pre­sum­ably the cus­tomer was embar­rassed that his account was delin­quent and didn’t want to face the sales­man he let down.  The salesman’s night­mare got worse when later that day he saw the cus­tomer in another booth nego­ti­at­ing his first-ever pur­chases from a com­pet­ing brand.

Unfor­tu­nately, at the moment the cus­tomer is not a cus­tomer any more.  And the longer the account is allowed to stay delin­quent, the lower the like­li­hood he’ll return to being a cus­tomer.  While he can’t buy from your orga­ni­za­tion, the cus­tomer is work­ing to develop new sources and rela­tion­ships.  Pos­i­tive expe­ri­ences with new ven­dors can lead to per­ma­nent lost sales for his­tor­i­cal ven­dors.  And the incen­tive to pay invoices to ‘his­tor­i­cal’ ven­dors dur­ing cash-crunches also goes down.

One enter­pris­ing credit man­ager we know has taken a novel approach to the delin­quent account process.  Their goal is to ‘Save Cus­tomers’ for the sales depart­ment.  He believes it is much eas­ier to res­ur­rect a pre­vi­ous cus­tomer than to gen­er­ate a new one, and in the process, gain the respect and appre­ci­a­tion of the sales depart­ment and senior management.

Here’s the 4 step process he uses to Save Customers:

  1.  Credit avail­abil­ity is auto­mat­i­cally sus­pended when accounts have invoices 15 days past due;
  2.  Inter­nal col­lec­tions fol­lows a pre­de­ter­mined let­ter, fax, email and phone call  col­lec­tion pro­ce­dure with exact tim­ing that is rig­or­ously implemented;
  3. Accounts are turned over to select col­lec­tion agen­cies auto­mat­i­cally when accounts are 90 days past due.  Sales­peo­ple are told “this cus­tomer needs spe­cial atten­tion” so they can become a cus­tomer again;
  4. Col­lec­tion agen­cies are instructed that while col­lect­ing is the high­est pri­or­ity, pre­serv­ing rela­tion­ships is also of para­mount impor­tance.  Only highly trained col­lec­tors are per­mit­ted to han­dle these accounts.

The results of this pro­gram have been astound­ing for over a decade.   Over 70% of claims are col­lected within 30 days of place­ment with the agen­cies (includ­ing our agency), and over 60% of these com­pa­nies place new orders within 90 days.  Over 85% of all claims are col­lected, so actual write-offs are min­i­mal.  It is extremely rare that a cus­tomer ever allows their account to become delin­quent again — they know this com­pany means busi­ness when it comes to its receiv­ables terms.

An added ben­e­fit is that senior man­age­ment real­izes the fees paid to col­lec­tion agen­cies to save a cus­tomer were nom­i­nal in com­par­i­son to what it costs to get a new cus­tomer.  So now when a sales­per­son hears that “this cus­tomer needs spe­cial atten­tion”, they know they are likely to have a “saved cus­tomer” and new orders in the next quar­ter.  And the Credit Man­ager is per­ceived as profit con­trib­u­tor and strate­gic thinker, with the respect and com­pen­sa­tion that comes with that accomplishment.




The Color of Money: No way to collect taxes

posted on 2014-05-27 by Michelle Singletary

 The federal government needs money. I get it.

The Internal Revenue Service has a significant number of overdue tax debts it needs to collect. More than 5 million taxpayers were delinquent near the end of April, according to the agency.

But a proposal to allow the IRS to turn over those delinquent accounts to private debt collection agencies isn’t the solution. It’s a bad idea, used before — in the late 1990s and again in the last decade. Both times the outsourcing failed.

Many people are already scared of the IRS if they owe money. I see little upside to this already tenuous relationship if we return to having private collection agencies go after tax delinquents.

This is also what Nina E. Olson, the national taxpayer advocate, said in a 21-page letter to the chairmen and ranking members of the congressional tax-writing committees. Ms. Olson noted that she and the Office of the Taxpayer Advocate were involved in the private debt collection program between 2006 and 2009.

“Based on what I saw, I concluded the program undermined effective tax administration, jeopardized taxpayer rights protections, and did not accomplish its intended objective of raising revenue,” Ms. Olson wrote. “Indeed, despite projections by the Treasury Department and the Joint Committee on Taxation that the program would raise more than $1 billion in revenue, the program ended up losing money. We have no reason to believe the result would be any different this time.”

Ms. Olson is also concerned that collection efforts would put a “bull’s-eye on the backs of low-income taxpayers,” who make up an overwhelming majority of folks whose accounts would be turned over to debt collectors.

I fear, as Ms. Olson does, that private debt companies driven to collect as much revenue as possible will result in overly aggressive collection tactics, including pressuring people to agree to payments they can’t possibly afford. If someone then defaults, it can cost more money to go back and establish a fairer payment plan.

“Low-income taxpayers often lack financial savvy and are terrified of what a debt collector might do to their lives,” Ms. Olson wrote.

The Federal Trade Commission has been regularly going after and sanctioning debt collectors for bad and illegal behavior. Debt collection is among the top consumer complaints received by the FTC.

Here’s something else about the pending tax-collection legislation that should cause concern. It would require the IRS to send delinquent cases arising from the Affordable Care Act to private debt collectors.

The collection agencies could get cases under two scenarios. With the ACA, people shopping on the health exchange may qualify for a tax credit to help pay for insurance. But consumers who receive too much of this subsidy must pay back the excess. Additionally, individuals and their dependents are required to have minimum essential health insurance unless they qualify for an exemption. If it’s determined they were in the financial position to pay for coverage and don’t fall under an exemption, they face a penalty for being uninsured, which they have to pay when they file their federal income tax returns.

The IRS is responsible for collecting in both instances. The IRS can snatch refunds to satisfy the debt. However, the agency is prohibited from using its usual tough collection tools to collect payments.

“If debt collectors come to be seen as the public face of the ACA, I am concerned that could make the IRS’ job more difficult as it tries to balance its twin missions of revenue collection and benefits administration,” Ms. Olson noted.

The proposal was introduced by Sen. Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., and has bipartisan support. But some congressmen and a consortium of 15 civil rights and consumer groups, who also penned a letter to senators, oppose the plan, as does the IRS Oversight Board, a nine-member independent body charged to oversee the IRS. The board also sent a letter to Senate and House leadership objecting to the proposal to use private debt collectors.

“The experiment has failed twice and there is nothing to lead us to believe it will not fail again,” the board said.

What’s the saying? Fool me once, shame on you. But fool me twice, shame on me. Using private collection agencies for tax debt is a foolish, foolish idea.





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